Remember that the "Cletus  Calendar" page will tell you what you should be doing this month, and the "Archive" page contains all of the previous months of the "Newsletter and Cletus Calendar".

Books that I have written:

"Beekeeping: A Personal Journey"--You can purchase it here on this site (Book page), in the classroom, Amazon.com or from Walter T. Kelley Bee Supply Company.

"Beekeeping: Questions and Answers"--You can purchase it here on this site (Book page), in the classroom, Amazon.com or from Walter T. Kelley Bee Supply Company.

(Novel series) #1 Tom Richards-Justice Served--You can purchase it in the classroom, Amazon.com or through Kindle. (Now available) (View it on Amazon.com)

(Novel series) #2 Tom Richards-Blood Trail of a Serial Killer--You can purchase it in the classroom, Amazon.com or through Kindle. (Now available) (View it on Amazon.com)

(Novel series) #3 Tom Richards-Voodoo Massacre--You can purchase it in the classroom, Amazon.com or through kindle. (Available in October)

If you would like for me to teach a class for your group in your area, contact me at; 400-101  dennis@lonestarfarms.net  for details.  

"Please, post your Lone Star Farms Bee club on your Face Book Page, and add our club website to your favorites.

Your host---For Sale--Bee Talk---Days Gone By

Your Host

Hello Everyone,

I hope that everyone is enjoying this Labor Day weekend. This year is passing by fast. It's already September. Beekeeping is slowing down and we need to think about preparing our bees for the winter months. Before you know it, Christmas will be here. Enjoy each day because who knows what tomorrow will bring.

Dennis

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Bee Talk

 Dennis, 

The last two queens   I bought have been a bust.  The first didn’t lay and ultimately the hive (small swarm) died.  Both queens were noticeably smaller than I’ve ever seen.  They were bought 4-5 weeks apart. 

The second was to replace a laying worker.  This hive has a lot of honey and a lot of pollen stores, no diseases, no beetles, no moths.  The population started to dwindle so I opened it up and went through each frame 3 times.  I found no queen, no eggs and only a dozen capped drone cells.  I put a new queen in and had to release her 4 days later since they didn’t get her out on their own.  I checked 5-7 days later and she was gone and the population was down even further.  I’m not sure what to do, especially if I can’t get a proper queen.  I thought of giving them a frame of eggs from a strong hive so they can rear their own.  Would that work?  Should I order a Russian maybe?  I know ordering queens at this time of year isn’t the best but I have two hives that need a new one. David D

David,

You can't introduce a new queen to a drone laying hive. They will kill her 100% of the time. They think they already have a queen even though it is a non-fertile laying worker. You have to first unite the hive with a queen right hive using the newspaper method and then make a split later if you want to increase your hive numbers. This time of year (August) I would unite the hive and then make splits next season.

Dennis

 Hi Dennis,

I found this link that might interest you.  New, all-natural pesticide unveiled by scientists - and it won't kill the bees!

 Hello Eve,

Wow, they tested it for a whole week? I guess that's longer than they usually test something. There are unanswered questions in this article. How is this product applied? Was it tested on the whole hive or just the field bees? How can you get any conclusive results in just a week? The very word "pesticide" tells the whole story. It may not kill the bees outright, but any amount of pesticide will weaken the bee’s immune system setting them up for contacting other diseases and pest.

These so called experts tend to down play the bad effects of things by using the word "Natural." There are a lot of natural products in the world that aren't good for you or your bees, like Thymol, Formic Acid and Opium   for an example.

We can't control all the pesticides that the experts come up with, but we do have control over "NOT" intentionally putting them in our hives.

 Have you thought about what the GMO’s are doing to our bodies?

 Dennis

 Hi Dennis,

I want to thank you for writing your beekeeping books. I have several books in my library, but yours is my favorite. It is full of make sense beekeeping techniques and it is easy to follow. Your book makes my other ones seem outdated. They are basically the same where as your book has modern techniques. I liked the first crime novel to. I’m going to buy the second one soon. Anyway, thanks,  Freda P.

Hello Freda,

Thank you for your kind compliments. I really enjoyed writing my books and I’m glad that you are enjoying them. If you would, go on Amazon and write a review on my book for me. Amazon rates books on the amount of positive reviews each book receives. The more positive reviews a book has, the closer to the top of their list the book goes. So, you would be helping me out if you took the time to write a good review for me. I appreciate it.

Dennis 

  Dennis,

The linked file of a 1908 Texas A&M Entomology  Dept. bulletin "Texas Honey Plants" is an interesting read.
The relative importance of some honey plants, as listed is amazing. For example yaupon is listed as "not important". Also, because this was published before tallow trees were introduced by the U. S. government in a failed attempt to start a vegetable tallow industry in the South the tallow tree is not mentioned. I guess that the bees in this area have not read this list of honey plants. I thought that the LSF group might find the list of interest. I look forward to class next Saturday.
Have a blessed weekend
Fred

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/39357/39357-h/39357-h.htm#Brassica_rapa_L

 Dennis,

We have a lot of Crepe Myrtle in our area, I was wondering if this a good source of nectar for the Honey Bees. Jim, Franklin, TN

 Hello Jim,

Crepe Myrtle does produce a small amount of nectar, but mostly pollen. In our area the flowers start producing around eight in the morning and by eleven, the flower shuts down. You won't find a bee on the flowers after about eleven. In some areas the flower doesn't produce at all. I think it must have something to do with the soil conditions. So, if you see any bees at all on the flower, the flower is producing.

Dennis

 Solar Wax Melter information sent in by member “Teddi Irwin”

http://www.hobbyfarms.com/crafts-and-nature/clarify-beeswax-with-solar-wax-melter.aspx?utm_source=SilverpopMailing&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=HF_2014-08-11_RB%20(1)&

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Days Gone By