\r\n If you are a member and have something to share that is "Bee" related such as a story or information, please send it to me by email.

\r\n

\r\n Remember that the "Cletus Calendar" page will tell you what you should be doing this month and the "Archive" page contains all of the previous months of the "Newsletter and Cletus Calendar".

\r\n

\r\n Please preview my new book ****** "Beekeeping: A Personal Journey" ****** on the book page. You can purchase it here on this site, in the classroom, Amazon.com or from Walter T. Kelley Bee Supply Company.

\r\n

\r\n "Post your Lone Star Farms Bee club on your Face-Book Page.

\r\n

\r\n Your host---For Sale--Bee Talk---Days Gone By

\r\n

\r\n Your host

\r\n

\r\n Hello Everyone,

\r\n

\r\n The months are flying by. Most of us in the warmer regions are in full swing with our bees. Here in Bryan, Texas we had a good yaupon flow this year because of the normal rain fall earlier in the year. Now we are hoping to have a good tallow flow. These are the months out of the year that most of us live for with our bees. The honey making season. With any luck, we can recoup our investment during this time by making a honey surplus.

\r\n

\r\n I am looking for some of our Northern members (And those in other countries.) who would be interested in contributing to our monthly newsletter each month on beekeeping in your area. The Northern climate gets a much later start with the bees than here in the Soutern states. If you are interested in contributing a monthly report on beekeeping in your area, please contact me for the specifics. It would help make our newsletter more interesting.

\r\n

\r\n For those of you who have not already purchased my new book, (shame on you.) I have added some new preview pages to view on the Book page. For those of you who live in Texas and belong to another bee club remember that I am available to teach classes at your club location upon request. Contact me for information.

\r\n

\r\n Dennis

\r\n

\r\n ____________________________________________________________________________________________

\r\n

\r\n A review on my book from Kim Flottum a monthly contributor to The Bee Culture Magazine.

\r\n

\r\n  Beekeeping. A Personal Journey. By Dennis Brown. 5.5” x 8.5”, 180 pages. Black and white drawings. Soft cover. ISBN 9781461055518. Self published. $20.00 available at www.lonestarfarms.net

\r\n

\r\n  Elsewhere in the section this month we mentioned that a good beekeeping book was mostly how the author did things, not how thing should be done. The former tends to be more personal, and productive. This book is how the author does things in his beekeeping operation in Texas. He writes in an informal, friendly manner, and has lots of good advice. He advocates using no chemicals for Varroa control, and doesn’t have to deal with harsh winters, so keep that in mind. There is a long Q & A section, a trivia section and a good glossary. This is an easy read…easily in an evening…and you’ll find some nuggets in there not found anywhere else. And visit his web page and if a mind, join his No Chemical Club at www.lonestarfarms.net.

\r\n

\r\n _____________________________________________________________________________________________  

\r\n

\r\n Bee Talk

\r\n

\r\n   Dennis,

\r\n

\r\n I have officially been a beekeeper for one week now. I installed two B Weaver NUCS on April 6 at our family farm in Colorado County. I followed your recommendation of using the Quail water jugs for syrup feeders in an empty deep. Since the location is a little over an hour from my home in Cypress I can make it down there about once a week. This is probably a blessing for the bees; it keeps me out of the hive more than necessary.
\r\n However, one hive is very active and went thru the gallon of syrup in less than a week. The other, less active, had about a half inch left.

\r\n

\r\n
\r\n There were several observations that totally amazed me. Let me know if they are normal.

\r\n

\r\n
\r\n 1. The empty feeder was found to have comb forming (see picture).
\r\n
\r\n 2. The active hive preferred to pass pollen thru the screened bottom instead of the main entrance.
\r\n
\r\n 3. Just before I opened one deep to check the syrup, a moth that was outside the deep flew into the hive. Within a minute, a ball of bees fell out of the hive. This ball was covering the unwanted visitor. They dismantled his wings, picked him up and carried the moth about 20 feet out of the garden fence. Very impressive!
\r\n
\r\n Am I correct by continuing syrup feeding as long as they are drawing comb on new foundation?
\r\n I noticed you are offering classes away from you home. Are you planning any in the Waller/Harris county area? I need to make up the last two classes.
\r\n
\r\n Marcus Labay
\r\n Cypress, Texas
\r\n 281 435 0027

\r\n

\r\n  Hello Marcus,

\r\n

\r\n It is normal to find burr comb in areas that are not "bee space" correct. I have never witnessed the workers passing pollen up through the bottom screen to their hive mates. I do find lots of pollen that has fallen through the screen bottom on the ground. The workers sometimes loose their load as they attempt to off-load inside the hive. Yes, you should continue to feed until the foundation has been drawn out. This helps the hive expand much faster.

\r\n

\r\n Dennis

\r\n

\r\n Hey Dennis, 

\r\n

\r\n      I have a scenario. I have been reading your warnings the last few weeks to watch for swarming signs. I have been going into the hives once a week looking for queen cells. I have not been finding any. I have also been adding more room to my hives to try to discourage any swarming. I told them don't swarm, but I forgot to put up my sign "NO SWARMING ALLOWED". Sunday I came home from church and found my best hive swarming. It appeared that they were just finishing. It looked like they may have been congregating high up in a tree just above about 30'.

\r\n

\r\n  So there was no way for me to get to them. Any way I went ahead and checked my hives. My swarm hive has two full medium supers and the top one is capped. There was one sealed Queen cell on the bottom of the capped super frame and two more queen cells further down on the bottom of the brood frames.

\r\n

\r\n   Now to get to your opinion. I am planning on taking my capped supper to a garden show that our club has been invited to and maybe show a demonstration on extracting the honey. This will be on the 14th, so I don't believe that the queen cells will be hatched open by then. Do you think I can very carefully with a razor blade scrape the cell off the frame and carefully set it between two frames in the lower brood chamber? Or should I just leave that frame in the hive and only take the other eight frames?

\r\n

\r\n  Whach Ya Think,    Mark

\r\n

\r\n  Hello Mark,

\r\n

\r\n  Tell me the hive configuration. What size boxes are you using starting with the bottom box moving up? Dennis

\r\n

\r\n  Dennis,

\r\n

\r\n  2 medium boxes with 10 frames for the initial brood boxes. I added one more medium for brood area then two 9 frame mediums at the top full of honey. When I check it this week end and I find the two top boxes are almost totally full of honey, then I will add another 9 frame super somewhere. Should it be on top or under the existing honey supers?      Mark

\r\n

\r\n  Hello mark,

\r\n

\r\n Are these the boxes the bees came out of the winter in? Dennis

\r\n

\r\n Dennis,

\r\n

\r\n  Not all of them. They went thru winter with the 2 bottom Brood boxes and 1 full 9 frame box full of honey. They really didn't use much of the honey at all. This is the box that I want to extract from on the 14th which is the one that has the queen cell attached to the bottom and is currently the top box...Mark

\r\n

\r\n  Mark,

\r\n

\r\n  Now that I have most of the facts, I can make sense of it all. It is extremely rare for a queen to move up above the second brood box to lay eggs. That is why I asked you those questions. The problem you are experiencing started back in the fall when you placed that honey super on top of the two brood boxes. As winter sets in the bees tend to move upwards and take their food stores with them. Eventually, all the food and bees will be in the top box in January/February (Texas). The queen will begin to lay a few eggs in January and slowly increase egg laying as time moves forward. Remember, the bees are in the top box when this happens. You had a honey super on top and that is why there is brood located there.

\r\n

\r\n  If you want to feed you bees in the fall by leaving a honey super on the hive, (honey is much better for the bees to winter on than sugar water) you should add that honey super on the bottom not the top. As winter gets closer, the bees will move all that honey with them into the upper boxes so they can form their winter cluster. In January or February you can pull that honey super out (without disturbing the bees) because it will be empty and you can use it for the early yaupon flow. (Texas). You should always add empty boxes (drawn-foundation) to the top.

\r\n

\r\n   I would find out why the bees are making queen cells. If there are queen cells in the other boxes, then I would assume that they are preparing to swarm. You can either cut that queen cell out of the frame and use it or get rid of it.

\r\n

\r\n  I hope that I have answered your questions.

\r\n

\r\n  Dennis

\r\n

\r\n Days Gone By

\r\n

\r\n  \"\"

\r\n

\r\n \"\"

\r\n

\r\n \"\"

\r\n

\r\n \"\"

\r\n

\r\n \"\"

\r\n

\r\n  

\r\n

\r\n   

', 1), (30, 'Newsletter', 'June-2012', '

\r\n If you are a member and have something to share that is "Bee" related such as a story or information, please send it to me by email.

\r\n

\r\n Remember that the "Cletus Calendar" page will tell you what you should be doing this month and the "Archive" page contains all of the previous months of the "Newsletter and Cletus Calendar".

\r\n

\r\n Please preview my new book ****** "Beekeeping: A Personal Journey" ****** on the book page. You can purchase it here on this site, in the classroom, Amazon.com or from Walter T. Kelley Bee Supply Company.

\r\n

\r\n "Post your Lone Star Farms Bee club on your Face-Book Page.

\r\n

\r\n Your host---For Sale--Bee Talk---Days Gone By

\r\n

\r\n Your host

\r\n

\r\n Hello Everyone,

\r\n

\r\n Here in the South, we are definitely in the middle of "Bee" season. This year we have had the right amount of rain at the right time. From January threw April, we had more rain then we had all of last year. Starting in May, we have fallen back into a drought situation in the Bryan, Texas area. Hopefully, it will not be as bad as it was last year.

\r\n

\r\n We did manage to have enough rain at the right time to provide us with a honey surplus this season. That is a blessing. Our  yaupon flow was moderate in April (lots of plants -40%-had died from the drought last year.) and the tallow flow is just now winding down but looks extremely promising.

\r\n

\r\n A new pest (new to me) arrived on the scene in the Bryan, Texas area (and a radius of probably 40 miles.) this year. The "Tachinid Fly" (white face) showed up by the thousands and took over all of the tallow trees and sweet clover. Fortunately, I had moved all my bees down South to catch a much larger tallow flow. These flies were not seen past a 40 mile radius of Bryan and the bees were able to work the trees down South. 

\r\n

\r\n If these flies are to become an annual event and spread across the land, then beekeeping will face another major pest and hardship. The sight reminded me of a locust invasion because there were thousands of them on the plants and trees. It was very disheartening to see. There wasn't one drop of nectar gathered by bees. In fact, there wasn't even enough room for a honeybee to land on the plant.

\r\n

\r\n If anyone has any information on this Fly other than what is on the Web, please let me know.   

\r\n

\r\n Dennis

\r\n

\r\n _____________________________________________________________________________________

\r\n

\r\n  Bee Talk

\r\n

\r\n  Dennis,

\r\n

\r\n Thanks again for answering all my questions. I feel like I may be bugging you with all the beginner stuff so let me know if I cross that line. I did just sign up for the May class but I’d rather be discussing new hives than extracting honey I haven’t even thought of making yet. Like you said, though, I’ll need it all at some point so I’m just happy for the education.

\r\n

\r\n I started this website two years ago specifically to help beekeepers of all levels in their beekeeping endeavor. There is so much bad information out there about beekeeping and how to manage the bees (another reason I wrote my book.) that I wanted to make a positive difference so that the beekeeper would have a chance to become successful and perhaps enjoy their success long enough to remain in the hobby.

\r\n

\r\n  I’m going to set up my hives this weekend in preparation to receive my nucs next weekend. Initially I plan to build a stand out of 4x4 treated wood. Is there a preferred length to provide any sort of separation between two hives? I read in one book that it’s good to separate the hives in spring/summer and put them together in the winter. Also am I safe to assume that initially I’ll have only one brood box (with 6 new frames to go with the four with brood) to house the nuc, with an empty box on top to house a sugar syrup feeder? Does the feeder just sit on top of the frames? Once the feeding has stopped should I remove the upper box or wait to add new frames once the bottom frames are drawn?

\r\n

\r\n  The stand dimensions that I have come up with over the years are; 4 feet long-18 inches high and 16 inches wide. I can place two hives on each stand that are about 6 inches apart. (I don't move them together in winter time. It doesn't get that cold in our part of the country.) I can work each hive from at least one side and the height is good on my old back.

\r\n

\r\n Your nuc will usually come with three frames and a feeder so you will need seven frames to add to the box. Yes, the feeder does sit on top of the frames. Keep feeding until the box has all the frames drawn-out. If there is no honey flow going on, remove the feeder, place the second brood box on top and replace the feeder so the bees can begin to draw-out the second box. When the second box is completely drawn-out and the bees have enough to eat, remove the feeder and spacer box. If the bees don't have enough to eat, continue feeding until they do. Never feed bees when there is a honey super on because you don't want to contaminate the honey super.

\r\n

\r\n  OK, last question. My property has several Eastern Bluebird boxes and a Purple Martin condo. Is there any problem locating the hives near these since both of these birds eat insects? To me that sounds like a silly question but I just have no idea how birds and bees interact and my most promising location has both houses nearby.

\r\n

\r\n  There is no problem with having bird houses near a bee yard. I have about a dozen bird houses.

\r\n

\r\n I hope this has helped you. I am always available to help you. That is what Lone Star Farms website is all about. (I send out invoices every 30 days. Just kidding.)    Dennis

\r\n

\r\n  Looking forward to your reply,

\r\n

\r\n David

\r\n

\r\n  Dennis, 

\r\n

\r\n I have all my boxes assembled and I’m now putting together frames.  I know you recommend wiring the honey super frames but what about the brood box frames?  I would assume you don’t need to wire these since you won’t normally extract from these but wasn’t sure if it was good practice to give them extra support.  If you do wire these how many wires do you use?  Also, when you place the foundation in the frame do you recommend embedding the wire or just alternating the foundation through the wires?

\r\n

\r\n  Thanks,    David

\r\n

\r\n  Hello David,

\r\n

\r\n  You should always wire every frame. This gives good support whether it is a brood frame or a honey frame. There are four holes pre-drilled on the side of each frame. You should wire the two middle holes of each frame. This will provide enough support.

\r\n

\r\n I prefer to embed my wires with an electric embedder. However, you can use a "Spur" to push the wires into the wax. You should place the wires on the same side of the foundation. Not "flip-flopped". 

\r\n

\r\n Dennis

\r\n

\r\n  Hey Dennis,

\r\n

\r\n  Have you ever heard of a bee fly?  It looks like a cross between a large house fly and a bee.  It seems this year they are everywhere.  I read on one website one of their food sources is bees.  Do you know anything about these things?  It seems that plants that normally attract bees also attract them and the bees tend to stay away.  They don't sting, but can bite I have read.    Jeff

\r\n

\r\n  Hello Jeff,

\r\n

\r\n I am "just" familiar with them. This year is the first time that I have seen them in such numbers. The technical name for them is, "Tachinid Fly". This year they ruined the first 2 weeks of the tallow flow. They were on the tallow tassels in such numbers that the bees had no chance to collect any nectar. If this becomes a normal occurrence, beekeeping will yet again be changed forever.

\r\n

\r\n  Dennis

\r\n

\r\n  Dennis,

\r\n

\r\n  I want to commend you on a very informative and interesting class. You were concise and patient with my questions. I am a ways away from being ready to install bees at my place. I am in the process of converting lawn into gardens with the hope of growing enough produce to share. I have been reading your book. I like what I have read.

\r\n

\r\n Thanks for the work you do.        Mary J McDaniel

\r\n

\r\n Hello Mary,

\r\n

\r\n  Thank you for your compliments. I hope that through my teachings in the classroom and my book that I will make your beekeeping experience a pleasurable one and long lasting.

\r\n

\r\n  Dennis

\r\n

\r\n Days Gone By 

\r\n

\r\n \"\"  

\r\n

\r\n \"\" 

\r\n

\r\n \"\"

', 1), (31, 'Newsletter', 'July 2012', '

\r\n If you are a member and have something to share that is "Bee" related such as a story or information, please send it to me by email.

\r\n

\r\n Remember that the "Cletus Calendar" page will tell you what you should be doing this month and the "Archive" page contains all of the previous months of the "Newsletter and Cletus Calendar".

\r\n

\r\n Please preview my new book ****** "Beekeeping: A Personal Journey" ****** on the book page. You can purchase it here on this site, in the classroom, Amazon.com or from Walter T. Kelley Bee Supply Company.

\r\n

\r\n "Post your Lone Star Farms Bee club on your Face-Book Page.

\r\n

\r\n Your host---For Sale--Bee Talk---Days Gone By

\r\n

\r\n Your host

\r\n

\r\n I hope that everyone has had a great bee season so far. If you had your bees next to tallow trees this year, you probably had a huge honey surplus. My hives not only pulled out lots of boxes of foundation but also filled them up with delicious tallow honey. Last year was a bust for many of us because of the drought, so it was a blessing to see the bees doing so well this year.

\r\n

\r\n ____________________________________________________________________________

\r\n

\r\n Nucs & Hives

\r\n

\r\n I am a member of the Lone Star Farms bee club. I have never used chemicals in my hives and I have been raising bees continuously for 35 years. I am offering a limited number of nucs as well as complete bee hives for sale. The cost for each nuc is $145.00 and the cost for each complete and established hive is $375.00. Both contain fresh 2012 laying  queens with proven laying patterns. The nucs consist of 5 deep frames hived in a corrigated plastic nuc box. The hives consist of 20 deep frames with a screened bottom and a migratory top. They can be picked up in Bryan, Houston or Galveston, Texas. If you are interested or need further information, please call me at 281.932.4887 or email me at demosautomotive@aol.com

\r\n

\r\n Thank you, Costa Kouzounis

\r\n

\r\n ____________________________________________________________________________

\r\n

\r\n  Bee Talk

\r\n

\r\n  Hey Dennis,

\r\n

\r\n I've enjoyed your classes and I'm looking forward to the next class. I don't think I can wait to ask this question.
\r\n
\r\n I got my 2 nucs in April and Put them in my hives. One nuc was substantially stronger than the other in the beginning and now it’s up to 2 full brood boxes and I'm anticipating putting a honey supper on it this weekend. The other is still in the 1rst brood box and seems to be stagnant. I've confirmed that I have a queen and I have lots of uncapped larvae but it's just not growing. I've checked for mites and see no signs of disease, I'm thinking I should re-queen the hive but I wanted to get your opinion.
\r\n
\r\n I'd appreciate any advice you could offer. See you in the next class.       Chris Lasater

\r\n

\r\n   Hello Chris,

\r\n

\r\n  Since you have had these two nucs, have you been feeding them? What type of feeder do you use? What sugar to water ratio are you mixing? On the strong hive, are all of the frames drawn out in both brood boxes? How much sealed brood do you see in the weak hive compared to just eggs and unsealed larvae? Do you see any empty queen cells on any of the brood frames? (The cells will look like a peanut.)

\r\n

\r\n  How did you check for mites? Were there any mites at all?

\r\n

\r\n  Dennis 

\r\n

\r\n  Dennis, 

\r\n

\r\n I cleaned up my 9-frame radial extractor last week, turned it on and "NOTHING!" Yikes! Finally took the control box apart and a wad of red/black ants were inside it with their nest! How in the world they found their way up the side of the stainless steel tank into the control box!! So far they fouled up my using it. I have a back-up hand-crank unit and have been extracting with it.

\r\n

\r\n  Appreciate all you do for us "beginner" beekeepers!     Chuck

\r\n

\r\n  Hello Chuck,

\r\n

\r\n  Now that you have extracted some honey from your own hive, you are "Officially" considered a beekeeper. Anyone can have a hive in their back yard but to raise the bees up to where they make you some surplus without using chemicals in the hive is the difference between a keeper of bees and a beekeeper. Congratulations. You are absolutely a true "Beekeeper".
\r\n
\r\n Don't get too cocky and think you can start missing classes. I have 48 years of beekeeping behind me and I still don't know it all.

\r\n

\r\n  Dennis

\r\n

\r\n  Hi Dennis,

\r\n

\r\n I bought your book and have enjoyed reading it very much. You cover things that I have never read in all the other books I have in my library. It is very informative.

\r\n

\r\n You mention in your book that you usually wait until the second week of the honey flow before you add an extra box to the hive so the bees can refill their boxes first. Should I wait if I have a hive that is in a single brood box before adding another one?

\r\n

\r\n Thanks for all you do for the beekeeping world and for your wonderful book.    Frank

\r\n

\r\n Hello Frank,

\r\n

\r\n Thank you for your compliments and I am happy to hear that you are enjoying my book so much.

\r\n

\r\n If you have a single brood box hive, I recommend that you add another brood box at the start of the flow so the bees will have time to draw that second box out and if the flow is strong enough, maybe even draw out a honey super for surplus.

\r\n

\r\n Dennis

\r\n

\r\n  Hi Dennis,

\r\n

\r\n My wife and I saw you at the Cent. TX Beekeepers meet in Brenham. Read your book and thought it was good.

\r\n

\r\n I have a question about feeding a nuc. I got a nuc on May 12 from Bee-Weaver in Navasota. You said (in your book) to feed them as long as they will take it. But, I'm trying to figure how much to feed them. Should I keep sugar water available constantly? Is there a certain amount that should be "plenty" each day? Now they are drinking about two quarts per day. Do they need to go on a diet?
\r\n Thanks,     Fred Mitchell

\r\n

\r\n  Hello Fred,

\r\n

\r\n  Thanks for the compliment on my book. I would recommend feeding until your bees completely draw out 2 brood boxes. Getting your hive into 2 brood boxes for winter time is key. That will allow your bees to have plenty of room for themselves and food storage through the winter.

\r\n

\r\n Once your bees are living in 2 completely draw brood boxes and they have some food storage, quit feeding. Depending on how good the flowers bloom in late summer, they may be able to pick up enough natural food so you won't have to feed them in the fall. You should perform a fall inspection (Fall Management chapter in my book.) to make sure the bees are ready for winter.

\r\n

\r\n  I hope that this has helped you.

\r\n

\r\n  Dennis

\r\n

\r\n Hey Dennis,

\r\n

\r\n  I've got a quick question for you.  My uncle who is getting out of beekeeping for health reasons wants to give me his three hives.  He lives about two hours away.  He claims his three hives are in two brood boxes each.  Now, my question is....What would be the best way to move them?  I have thought about robbing them first and then moving them, to make it much lighter.  But then I got to thinking that the top box is probably full of brood and I wouldn't be able to rob them.  So, would it be acceptable to separate each hive and reassemble them once I got them home?  I don't know I've never had to move large hives like this before.  I know they will be heavy and I will be on my own with no help.  Any advice would be greatly appreciated!    Jeff

\r\n

\r\n  Hello Jeff,

\r\n

\r\n  There are a couple of things you should think about first. First, you should not rob any honey from the 2 lower brood boxes. The bees will need these stores during the year. If you do rob it, you may have to feed the bee’s sugar water later in the year which is not as healthy for the bees plus sugar is expensive. I always let the bees have whatever they can store in the first 2 brood boxes. If they produce anything above the 2 brood boxes, I will call that surplus and extract it for myself.

\r\n

\r\n  Secondly, you need to pay attention to any bee diseases in these hives. You certainly don’t want to bring any diseases into your main bee yard. Find a new spot a couple of miles away from your main yard to locate them for a while before you bring them home. Have an extra pair of gloves and an extra hive tool to use specifically in the new yard in case you do find a disease. This way you don’t spread it to the main yard.

\r\n

\r\n  You will have to break each hive down and load them on the truck. Put down a strap first, then the bottom board on top of the strap and then the 2 brood boxes. (In the same order they were.) Now strap the hive together. Perform this system on each hive until they are all loaded. If you have a screen bottom board, you can use a solid piece of wood to block the entrance. If you are using a solid bottom board, you will need to provide a screen entrance cover for the bees to have ventilation.

\r\n

\r\n  Maybe when you get to the new location, you can find someone to help you unload. That way, you can lift each hive intact and place them on their new hive location. If not, you will have to perform the same system as before to get them off the truck and into place.

\r\n

\r\n  I hope this has helped you and it was good to hear from you.

\r\n

\r\n  Dennis

\r\n

\r\n  Dennis,

\r\n

\r\n  Chris was wondering, is this an ok time of year to move them? Because last year we moved our two hives from Houston to Bastrop in July when very hot (no choice as our friend was selling the land they were on). The Buckfast fared fine but the American succumbed to wax moth and we lost it. It happened very fast, they were thriving before the move.     Kathy

\r\n

\r\n  Kathy,

\r\n

\r\n The only time you should not move bees is in the winter. You don't want to disturb the winter cluster. As long as you provide good ventilation, you can move your bees during the rest of the year.

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\r\n  In a brood box the queen will keep the brood nest towards the center. Each frame will have a half moon shape of honey at the top and a half moon shape of pollen under that. Then there will be brood to fill up the rest of the frame. They will usually fill the outer frames with just honey. This is in each brood box up to 2.

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\r\n  You should "never" remove any of these food stores for your own use. These food stores in these 2 brood boxes should be for the bees only. Sometimes if these boxes are packed with honey, it will carry them through the winter and sometimes it won't. It is all depending on whether Mother Natural provides the bees with other nectar sources along the way.

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\r\n  Dennis

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\r\n   Days Gone By

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